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Last Updated: Jan 8th, 2011 - 16:45:13 

History & Government  


Schindler's List
By Sarah Lane
Aug 22, 2006, 12:02 PST



Schindler’s List
‘Who ever saves one life, saves the world entire.’

Movies in the Classroom



Grade Level: 9-12, college

Subject:
History, Holocaust, World War II

Keywords: Lesson plan, Movies in the Classroom, History, Genocide, Holocaust, World War II, Oskar Schindler, Jewish people, Star of David, concentration camp, Poland, nazi, Political, Biographical, Discrimination.

Author: Sarah Lane

Affiliation: ClassBrain, Inc.

Date: 13 August, 2002

Duration: 1-3 Class Periods

BACKGROUND
The world will never forget the millions who suffered in the attempted genocide of the Jewish people during World War II. In the midst of evil there were heroes who never intended on becoming thus. The story of Oskar Schindler and his famous ‘list’ is about one of those unlikely heroes. Shown in the classroom, this movie will have a profound effect on your students and will raise much by way of humanitarianism and also historical topics for further class discussions.


OBJECTIVES

Watch Schindler’s List or excerpts from Schindler’s List followed by a class discussion concerning the material presented. Use the resources provided to answer the following questions:

Can one individual change the world today, against all odds?

Are there similar situations of genocide in the world today?

Why is it important for our future to remember this movie?

Is it possible for a person to completely change their ways?

Why do some people still say today that the attempted extermination of the Jewish people never happened?

How is Schindler’s idea of capitalizing on the misfortune of the Jews similar to situations in today’s world?

Have your students define a way to help someone, or perhaps a group of people, and have them implement their plan. Use the list of volunteer web sites from the Internet resources below for ideas.


RESOURCES

Schindler’s List
Internet Resources

AVAILABLE WORKSHEETS
None

FILM 1: Schindler’s List 1993

Synopsis: Seemingly content with the lifestyle of an opportunist and victimizer, Oskar Schindler undergoes a personal metamorphisis into a humanitarian. Instead of taking advantage of the Jewish people and their situation, he uses his connections and a factory in Poland to save hundreds of them from the horrors of genocide.

Genre(s): Drama, War

Rating: R (Nudity, Violence, Profanity)

Family Rating: kids-in-mind

Running Time: 197 minutes

Primary Actors: Liam Neeson, Ben Kingsley, Ralph Fiennes, Caroline Goodall

Director: Steven Spielberg

Music: Glen Glenn Studios, Todd-AO Scoring Stage

Screenplay: Steven Zaillian

Producers: Steven Spielberg, Amblin Entertainment, Universal Pictures

Studio: Sony Pictures


READING CONNECTIONS



RELATED INTERNET RESOURCES


United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
This is a very extensive and well done site. There’s an Education section for students, families, teachers, and adults. Visit the research section for the Survivors Registry, Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies, and Library Collections. The History section has online and museum exhibitions, a Holocaust Learning Center, and personal histories. The Remembrance and Conscience sections are equally important.
Source: USHMM

Oskar Schindler: An Unlikely Hero
Learn about the life of Schindler and get information on traveling exhibitions.
Source: USHMM Collection

Schindler’s List
Who was Schindler? What was the list? Answer these questions and go behind the scenes of Steven Spielburg’s movie, Schindler’s List. Read online chat transcripts or check the list of special T.V. broadcasts. See video clips and film credits.
Source: PBS Online

A Cybrary of the Holocaust
Share art, discussions, photos, poems, and facts to remember the tragedy of the Holocaust. Visit the Forums, learn about the camps, conduct research, and find out how you can help.
Source: Cybrary Community

The Holocaust History Project
This is a free archive of documents, photos, recordings, and essays regarding the Holocaust.
Source: Holocaust History

A Teacher’s Guide to the Holocaust
This has thousands of resources for teachers and students including photographs, documents, art, music, and literature. A timeline, further resources, and student activities are also available.
Source: Florida Center for Instructional Technology, College of Education, University of South Florida

Genocide in the 20th Century
This essay explores the Nazi Holocaust from 1938 to 1945 and the six million deaths which resulted. There are also maps, photos, and a Holocaust Timeline.
Source: The History Place


VOLUNTEER SITES TO HELP MAKE A DIFFERENCE


USA Freedom Corps
Everyone can do something. That’s the idea President Bush has put forward in his call to service. Each citizen of the United States is asked to devote two years to helping their neighbors. Choose your interest, choose your location, and find opportunities now.
Source: Corporation for National and Community Service

Get out. Do good.
VolunteerMatch is a non-profit online service that helps interested volunteers find local volunteer opportunities matching individual interests and schedules. Simply enter your zip code to see what’s happening in your own back yard. You can also post information for any opportunity for which you need volunteers.
Source: VolunteerMatch

Do Something.
This organization will help you get involved in your community. At your school, you and your friends will identify issues you care about and create community projects to turn your ideas into action. Start a Do Something club at your school today.
Source: DoSomething.org

Ending Hunger
This is the nation’s largest domestic hunger relief organization. Using food banks and food-rescue programs they provide assistance to more than 23 million Americans each year. Their goal is to end hunger in America.
Source: America’s Second Harvest

MENTOR
Becoming a mentor can change a child’s life for good. Learn how to become a mentor, how to find a mentor, or how to run a mentor program. Enter your zip to discover opportunities near you or click on the Take Action button.
Source: The National Mentoring Partnership

SERVEnet
A premier web site for service and volunteering. Register with an organization and become a volunteer. Users can enter their zip code, city, skills, interests, and availability, and be matched with organizations needing help.
Source: SERVEnet.org




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