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Last Updated: Apr 21st, 2011 - 14:44:53 

Women's History Month



Profiles of Great Women: Part 3
By Sarah Lane
Jan 21, 2008, 13:10 PST



Profiles of Great Women (3)

Profiles of Great Women – Part 3

 

Emily Dickinson - Poet

Emily Dickinson was born on December 10th, 1830 in Amherst, Massachusetts.  She grew up and remained at home without ever marrying.  She graduated from Amherst Academy in 1847.  It has been said that seven to ten poems of hers (no one could agree on the number) were published during her lifetime anonymously and without her permission.  Regardless, the editors altered them. 

 

Between the years 1858 and 1866, Dickinson wrote more than 1100 poems.  Publishers continued to ignore her original metaphors, aphorisms, paradoxes, off rhymes, and eccentric grammar.  She continued to write, however, with the major focus on subjects such as love, separation, death, nature, and God.

 

On May 15th, 1886, Emily Dickinson died of nephritis, a kidney disease.  Although she never got to experience the fame she craved, the magic of her poetry is appreciated greatly by all who have studied, read, and understood her talent.

Source:     Biography Resource Center

 

Additional Learning Links for Emily Dickinson

 

Emily Dickinson International Society

This site allows you to access the Emily Dickinson Journal, the society’s scholarly periodical and the Emily Dickinson Bulletin, the society’s newsletter.  Their purpose is to promote, perpetuate, and enhance the study and appreciation of Emily Dickinson throughout the world.  They help to establish and support local chapters and a center for Dickinson studies.

Source:              Case Western Reserve Society

Reading Level:  Hard

 

Dickinson Homestead

Check out these images of the Dickinson homestead from the inside and out.

Source:              Mount Holyoke College

Reading Level:   Easy

 

Dickinson Electronic Archives

These are the writings of the Dickinson family featuring Emily Dickinson’s Correspondences.  You can also view ‘Teaching with the Archives’ featuring The Classroom Electric, responses to Dickinson’s writing, citations and research resources.  You will find rare and out of print resources here as well.

Source:             Martha Nell Smith

Reading Level:   Hard




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